Wood Gone Viral!

After seeing how amazing my first batch of laser-cut wood designs turned out, I decided I needed to make a LOT more!

With the approach of ASV 2018, viruses were the obvious choice. It doesn’t hurt that viruses lend themselves beautifully to a clean, graphic style that works so well in this medium! I came up with five new virus designs, covering a broad range of known virus families.

With so many recent business expenses, the only way I can get these done is with a bit of external funding. That’s where you come in! I’ve created an IndieGoGo campaign, “Wood Gone Viral“, where you can support my art efforts and get one or more of these awesome new designs! Of course not everyone is a huge virus nerd like me, so I’ve also created a reward level that lets you choose from a limited selection of the earlier wood designs instead. Or, if you just want to show my campaign a little love on a tight budget, you can get an exclusive photo of one (and if you’re lucky, both) of my beautiful kitties, or a set of virus stickers!

I’m pleased to announce that the campaign is halfway funded, but there’s still a long way to go, and only 17 days left to get there. I also have some fun stretch goals planned, so the more love this campaign gets, the happier we’ll all be!

Please share this with all your friends and help me make ALL THE THINGS!

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A whole new world (of wood!)

…or maybe that should be “a whole new wood”! There’s been all sort of fun new stuff happening in the Land of the Muddlers lately, and there’s more to come very soon (but that will have to wait for another post). The big news for today is my new line of laser-cut wood accessories! I’ve been working with the fantastic folks at The Maker Bean here in Toronto to develop these, and boy howdy are they ever SWEET (I mean the new products, but Lorraine and Chris are also utterly delightful).

I’ve started small with a handful of designs made into keychains and/or earrings for a grand total of 9 new products. All are now available in my Etsy shop :)

bacteria_earrings_01
Flagellate bacteria earrings (Pseudomonas syringae) – 5cm long
bacteria_keychain_04
Flagellate bacteria keychains (Pseudomonas syringae) – 6cm long
beetle_keychain_04
Jewel beetle keychain (Buprestis rufipes) – 8cm long
DNA_earrings_02
DNA earrings – 5cm long
DNA_keychain_02
DNA keychains – 8cm long
tardigrade_dangle_02
Tardigrade keychains / purse dangles / luggage tags – 8cm long
virus_earrings_02
Icosahedral virus stud earrings – 1.5cm wide
widow_earrings_03
Black widow spider (Latrodectus spp.) earrings – 4cm long
widow_keychain_04
Black widow spider (Latrodectus spp.) keychains – 6cm long

A Scien-terrific Holiday Pop-Up!

For the first time ever, Toronto is getting a handmade holiday pop-up shop just for science lovers! On December 9th and 10th, the Toronto Etsy Street Team will host A Scienterrific Holiday Pop-Up at their gallery at 906 Queen St West. Between the hours of 10am and 8pm, you’ll be able to buy beautiful handmade gifts for all your science-loving friends and family, and maybe a little something for yourself ;)

Check out the list of vendors below!

 

Nanopod Studio
Purple Lilac Amigurumi
Geeky Bobbin
The Vexed Muddler
Neurons and Nebulas
Minouette

 

Project: Ocean vessel

A couple of years ago I spent some time at a studio out in the east end of the city. I worked under a potter there who was a brilliant sculptor, and it was under her tutelage that I learnt most of the core slab-building techniques that I now use. 

When most people think of pottery, what comes to mind is the classic scene from Ghost, where Patrick Swayze “helps” Demi Moore on the pottery wheel, and sexiness ensues. (Let me assure you that there’s nothing sexy about wet clay. It gets everywhere, and it’s gritty.) Wheel-throwing is just one method of building structures in clay, though. It’s great if you want something round, or at least round-ish, but it’s far from the pinnacle of the fine art of pottery. 

Slab-building doesn’t employ a wheel at all, though you can build most of the same basic shapes with it. Instead, the potter begins with a hunk of clay and rolls it out flat, much as you would a pie crust. The slab can be draped, pressed into a mould, folded, twisted, curled, cut into strips and re-attached at crazy angles – the options are endless. 

For this piece, I started with a slab draped over a dinner plate for a gently rounded base. Then I cut asymmetrical strips and attached them to build up the sides and form the handles. 

I didn’t have any specific creatures in mind as I formed it, but rather impressions of sponges and corals and sea stars and eels and seaweed. I wanted it to evoke the feeling of a coral reef without actually depicting one. Similarly, I chose glazes that call to mind the ocean for the interior of the vessel, but glazed the outside in the matte white of bleached shell and bone and coral. 

This is one of my favourite pieces, so I hope you enjoy it!

Be still, my Cretaceous heart

After months of planning and consultation with several helpful nerds, I’m pleased to present my latest art work! I made this piece specifically for the Dinovember art show at the Toronto Etsy Street Team Gallery in Toronto. If you’re in the area, you can check it out until November 14th.

Here’s the video of the installed piece. You’ll want to be in a quiet space and crank the volume up – the music is subtle even in situ, and my phone didn’t pick it up as well as I’d have liked.

 

I had to learn a few new tricks for this project. The sound (an original composition by Brian Engh, used with permission) is controlled by an Arduino Uno with an Adafruit Music Maker shield. I used copper wire for the veins on the exterior of the heart, and these are attached to the stack to act as antennae for the capacitive sensor. When you approach the heart, the sound is triggered.

Here are some making-of photos :)

 

The heart itself is earthenware clay, and based on a chicken heart. The magnolias I sculpted from Fimo. The cycad and ferns are synthetic, but the moss and lichen are real, and the blue morpho butterfly is one I pinned myself at a workshop a couple of months back :)

I learnt to solder (thanks to Ele Willoughby, who also talked me through the whole process and dealt with my panic and terror with infinite patience and grace), connect speaker wires, and splice a USB cable to a power connector. I read a lot about resistors and capacitance and absorbed only barely enough of it to get this working, albeit with room for improvement.

And now I’m thinking about my next Arduino project ;)

 

Inktober 2017 – week 4

Inktober is almost at an end! I’m finding myself a bit ambivalent about the month coming to a close. I’m a little relieved that there will no longer be so much pressure to find time to draw Every. Single. Day., but it’s also been a lot of fun and a great challenge for me. Since I’m naturally rather lazy (and simultaneously extremely busy due to work + business), I’m concerned that I won’t keep up with playing around in traditional 2D media. I know myself too well to believe that I’ll make time for it without having some sort of specific time-limited challenge or goal, but this is something I want to keep mucking about with. So, I put it to you, dear readers: what is my next challenge? How do I keep driving myself to play with actual pigment on paper? I welcome your suggestions, either here or on Twitter.

While you mull that over, here are this week’s offerings. As always, you can click to see the original tweet.

Previous #Inktober posts:
Week 1
Week 2
Week 3

 

Day 22: autumn leaves
Day 22: autumn leaves
Day 23: Cookie sea star
Day 23: Cookie sea star
Day 24: Pseudoscorpion
Day 24: Pseudoscorpion
Day 25: Moustache tree
Day 25: Moustache tree
Day 26: Skin cross-section
Day 26: Skin cross-section
Day 27: Figure planning sketch
Day 27: Figure planning sketch
And just for interest’s sake – Day 27b: Figure first draft (digital media)
Day 28: Alaus oculatus click beetle
Day 28: Alaus oculatus click beetle

Project: Type III Secretion System (T3SS) vase

Sometimes projects don’t work out quite the way we intend. Sometimes you get done with a thing and think “wow, that is not what I was going for”.

A while ago I had the brilliant idea to make a vase in the form of the bacterial type III secretion system. This is basically an assemblage of proteins that some bacteria are able to make, which they use like a tiny syringe to inject stuff into cells that they want to hijack. It’s a pretty cool shape:

Figure from: Structural and functional genomic analysis of the salmonella enterica host-restricted serotype abortusovis by Massimo Deligios

 

I took an unplanned 3-week break from the studio shortly after starting the base structure (the blue section). The shape was pretty much where I wanted it, but I needed to add the upper segments. Unfortunately by the time I got back in to the studio again, the main structure had dried too much to add pieces, so I had to make them separately and add them on. it didn’t really work as well as I’d hoped, and frankly I got a bit demoralized and rushed the collar section, so it’s not really the right shape or scale at all. I am pretty happy with the base and the detail I added on the underside, though, so I’ll definitely revisit this design later on down the road and try to do a better job of it. Heck, I might even try making it on the wheel.